Medical Books that Don’t Exist

To my knowledge, the medical books listed below do not exist. If you have the talent and/or resources, please consider writing one of them. If you believe that any of these books does exist, please send me any information you can about them.

  1. A comprehensive multilevel 12-lead EKG book, one that takes the reader from novice to expert and covers diagnosis and management of relevant clinical scenarios.
  2. An acid-base book: I am looking for something “simple,” with up to thirty or so clinical scenarios, including those of  double or triple acid-base disorders, along with their ABGs, their (long form!) solutions and treatment recommendations, as well as what not to do, and why. [Update of December 14, 2012: I found such a book. It's called Acid Base Case Studies (2004) by Ira Kurtz MD. It is now listed as one of the best medical books of all time.]
  3. A straightforward, concise nephrology book which emphasizes the understanding, diagnosis and treatment of specific clinical problems in nephrology (e.g. hyponatremia, nephritis, acute renal failure, etc.) other than hemodialysis
  4. A good book on hand medicine for the general practitioner. It seems to me that many hand books are either written for the lay person or for the hand surgeon. I am looking for a good book for someone right in the middle of these two extremes….
  5. A solid, preferably single-author monograph on autoimmune diseases: when presented with a clinical problem, we seldom, if ever, ask, “Does this patient have a rheumatological disease?” Rather, the question asked in our minds is, “Could this problem be autoimmune in nature?” As such, I would like to see a book specifically on autoimmune diseases.
  6. An exceptional handbook on sports medicine
  7. A captivating book on evolutionary medicine
  8. A stellar book on the history of medicine
  9. An updated, practical and contemporary book on critical care medicine

by Mark Yoffe MD

[Updated on December 14, 2012. Please read important Disclaimer.]
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6 Comments

  • ekgpress says:

    A comprehensive multilevel 12-lead EKG book that takes the reader from novice to expert and covers diagnosis and management of relevant clinical scenarios DID exist – but is now out of print …. (Grauer K: Practical Guide to ECG Interpretation- 2nd Edition – Mosby, St. Louis, 1998; 491 pages).

  • It would be nice to have a book like that in print. When can we expect the next edition to come out?

    • ekgpress says:

      I have rights to that book – so at some point I’ll publish an update on line. In the meantime – the essence of that book is available in several “pieces” in my ECG-2011-PB book (and its ePub version) – my ECG-PDF Course – and the many tracings (with detailed explanations) and didactic pdfs posted on my free on-line ECG Blog resource (http://ecg-interpretation.blogspot.com ).

  • Ken,

    By coincidence, I ran into your “Practical Guide” EKG book today in our emergency department’s consult room. It’s a wonderful book that ties together a lot of you EKG teachings in other places, and almost all of the content is still relevant to modern practice. I will nonetheless be keeping my eyes open for your online updated edition.

    I am really looking forward to it. I think you would be making a really important contribution to the world of medicine if you could publish an update soon.

  • ekgpress says:

    Thank you Mark for your kind words. As you know – I have just completed expanding and updating NEW 5th edition (2013) versions of my ACLS Pocket Brain (https://www.kg-ekgpress.com/shop/item/3/) and my ACLS: Practice Code Scenarios (https://www.kg-ekgpress.com/shop/item/6/). I am very busy at work on ePub versions of both books.

    My “next project” after the above – is to expand and update my current ECG-2011 Pocket Brain (https://www.kg-ekgpress.com/shop/item/1/). By making this new edition spiral-bound and ~150 pages – it will virtually satisfy your request for an ECG book that “takes the reader from novice to expert and covers diagnosis and management of relevant clinical scenarios” – while still retaining convenient small size (just like my new ACLS-2013 Pocket Brain does for that subject). I will then develop an ePub for my new ECG book with advantage that much more material can easily be incorporated into an ebook that is not limited by size constraints.

    Bottom Line: Although I am admittedly 100% biased – I believe that within the next 8-10 months you’ll have that special “ECG book” both in hard copy and electronic form that fulfills the requirements you set. THANKS again for your kind support of me and my work.

  • You are very welcome, Ken!

I would appreciate your comment:

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